What a week

Blossoms. Always hope.
Hiroshima: April 2006

like all of us, Coronavirus dominated my world. Not to say it’s anything like Hiroshima, but the blossoms there always reminded me of resiliency, and them blooming here this week gives me hope.

Lots to say, but nothing to add to the conversation beyond: Stay safe everyone. And for those of you newly working from home, Liz has some great advice and wardrobe suggestions.

As I wrote some of this on Friday night I had to look at Strava because I had no recollection of workouts.  Not that I was doing any specific workouts as I recovered from my knee anyway, but running now is just a little bit of therapy amid the uncertain world.

Weekly Run Down with birthday girl Kim and Deborah:

Lower Manhattan from Edge
  • Monday: knew in advance this Monday would be missed. Was at the opening of Edge, NYC’s newest observation deck. As Darlene can attest from our lighthouse escapades in Bermuda, I don’t do heights well so I didn’t fully explore it to its maximum capacity. It was a stunning view though.
  • Tuesday:  reality hit that the week was going to be a doozy. Luckily I packed my light vest and was able to run commute home. Short is better than nothing. Apparently I had a walk too, which I literally did not remember until I looked at instagram.
  • Wednesday: fitting that on the last “normal” day, I crammed in a press preview for Asia Week and the Brooklyn Museum’s amazing Studio 54 exhibit.
  • Thursday: happy third raceversary to me! Day was anything but “happy” as Coronavirus came to play in New York City. But this is a resilient city.
  • Friday: plan was to run before I worked from home, but I woke to driving ran. It eased by 8:30 giving me time to go on a literal coffee run before work. Ended up longer than planned as first 7/11 had only boring creamer, which was my reason for buying coffee. After a long work day I hit Central Park for some much needed zen. Tried to find the beauty in the early spring blooms.
Social distancing with a side of silliness
caught ‘gramming
  • Saturday: a beautiful day. A friend and I who I’d spent time with all week decided if one of us was exposed we’d already exposed the other and the risk of a walk in the park was worth it. With such a huge space, Central Park is probably one of the easiest places for New Yorkers to social distance. Crocuses and cherry blossoms at the same time is so weird, but then again this was a bizarre winter. Side note: I really, really love that run commute backpack. Not just for its intended purchase, but also helpful for stashing stuff for errands and gym visit after. Alas, toilet paper didn’t fit and I still needed to buy a bag.
  • Sunday: continuing the apartment organizing to better work from home. Hi, early spring cleaning. Maybe gym for the PT exercises I can’t do at home. Maybe walk.

Plan for the week: who knows. Trying to run before work three/four days to keep off the stir crazy. Signed up for the ZOOMA Fitter, Stronger, Faster challenge if I need home workout tips if it comes to that. You should too, it’s free thanks to the amazing ZOOMA team. We’ll see what life & covid19 bring us. Stay safe everyone.

Race Recap: Zooma Bermuda

more to come on Bermuda overall in, hopefully, a #TravelTuesday post. In the mean time, my thoughts on an amazing racecation. First of all, major love and shout out to the entire Zooma and OnPace race teams. They and their partners put on a fabulous inaugural Bermuda race and I can’t wait to return to the island or do another one of their races. So many cities, so little time.

Runners’ Roundup

Linking up with Debbie, Deborah, Rachel, Lisa, Jen and Smitha for the new Wednesday “Runners’ Roundup” to discuss the Zooma Bermuda challenge. Apologies in advance for an insanely long recap. I enjoyed this weekend almost as much as I did my first Half Marathon.

The weekend in a nutshell

Three happy runners

In no particular order this weekend involved:

  • meeting amazing people including Marcia and Erika. Spoiler, when you’ve read one another’s blogs for two+ years, it really doesn’t feel like “meeting” and you can chat easily for hours.
  • exploring the island of Bermuda with Darlene
  • running an amazingly scenic and hilly Half Marathon
  • not getting swept in said Half marathon
  • learning how to embed an instagram photo in a blog post. Or maybe that was just me. LOL. There are approximately forty bazillion photos on my Facebook as well. 

The results of our hard work:

 

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But… rewinding….

As US-based runners, we received our swag bags before we flew, which was great. This included a map of Bermuda,  the gorgeous tanks in the second photo here and a super soft quarter zip. Both fit surprisingly well, and I actually wore the tank!

The Expo

After a day + exploring the island on our own and with some other early arrivals, Zooma Bermuda officially kicked off with a welcome reception at the Fairmont Southampton, our wonderful host hotel. This also served as the Expo during which we could pick up our bibs, wrist bands for transportation and activities and other purchased items. As someone who wishes races were generally more sustainable and generated less waste, I loved that the bib was the same for Saturday and Sunday’s races.

Since it was a relatively small race and the Expo was in a hotel ballroom at a fixed time, we had the opportunity to meet other runners and the On Pace team. I have run with pacers before, but with a great ratio of pacers to runners we had the opportunity to truly engage with the pacers. I really appreciated the opportunity to talk with them about their plans and felt they really listened to my goals for the race. As someone who doesn’t always do well with new people, it was also helpful to meet “my” pacer before the morning of the race.

The Field Trips

 

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Besides races, Zooma organized some optional field trips for those of us visiting the island. I was excited by Saturday’s to the Crystal Caves as they appeared to be absolutely stunning. They did not disappoint.  I had a particular chuckle as the shuttle we used to go to and from operated under the name “Bermuda Triangle Tours”. Life’s too short not to have a sense of humor.  If/when I go back to Bermuda, I’d probably stay a little more central – there was a lot of travel time between Hamilton, the caves and the airport that I’d prefer to eliminate in a shorter stay.

We also hit up the iconic Swizzle Inn, and while I stayed away from a Dark and Stormy or Rum Swizzle ahead of a race, I definitely soaked up the atmosphere. The real up side of being in Bermuda in the off season was the sites & restaurants had no issue accommodating the large groups.  In addition, we were able to get 20% off entrees for our closing dinner at Henry VIII. If I sprout fins and swim away from my blog it’s because of all the delicious fish I ate at the weekend. Wahoo, fish and chips and conch fritters, oh my!

Lighthouse Run

nice signage to mark the route!
can report we did not blow away despite my hair’s best efforts
#TwinningIsWinning

The length of this race changed a couple of times due to road conditions. As the day dawned and remained dark and stormy – a tribute, no doubt, to one of the sponsors and welcome drinks (!!) it solidified our plans to walk the run rather than risk Sunday’s run.

Dressing for high 50s/low 60s with wind and rain is a challenge coming out of Northeast winter. I made a gametime decision to put on a long sleeve tech shirt under the Strong Fricken’ Women tee, which I thought particularly appropriate for this women-focused series. I was very glad I did so as wet tee shirt is never a good feeling. This was semi-planned twinning as Darlene wore this one day and I loved the pattern and told her I was going to be a copycat. This was the first chance since that we both planned to wear capris, so it had to happen.

An unexpected find during the Zooma weekend was all the Skirt. One icebreaker on Friday’s field trip to Hamilton was someone wearing the same pattern as Darlene, and another woman told us how we could find at the Expo based on which Skirt she’d be wearing.

I had a poncho, but didn’t bother as the rain wasn’t particularly heavy but mostly annoying. The route was nice as the road wound down from Gibbs Lighthouse to Horseshoe Bay, and I’m sure would have been even more scenic on a clear day. For some reason I wore and turned on the Garmin, I’m sure it will soon be touting a new 1.5 mile race record. LOL.

Three happy, wet runners

 

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The Half Marathon

Flat Cari

Long sleeves was the wrong choice for 60s, but a few weeks ago when I accepted reality that this Half was going to be a challenge I’d stubbornly decided (Yes, I’m stubborn, this is a theme) I was going to wear my NYC Marathon shirt to remind me of what I had done just a few months ago. I survived, I did not melt.

On the go! We ran a chunk of the race together and she ultimately PRed

aka the reason we were all in Bermuda. There were some 200 runners in all, with us split relatively evenly between the Half Marathon and the 10K. As I mentioned last week, I contemplated dropping to the 10K as a result of my complete lack of training due to injury. Once I found out there was a 3.5 hour cut off, I had a feeling I could do it and decided to go for it. This was further confirmed when I met Esther from On Pace at the pool early in the week and she confirmed it wasn’t a hard limit and that no one would be left behind.

We boarded the race shuttles a a little before six, bringing us to the start area in Barr Park in plenty of time to enjoy a beautiful sunrise and prepare. While I think we could have arrived a little later, I totally understand the cushion for an inaugural race especially given the construction and narrow roads in Hamilton. Just after 7:30 we were off.

 

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Did I mention narrow roads and hills? Someone told us that while Bermuda is only 20 square miles it has more than 300 miles of roads. I’d believe that, and what the airport shuttle driver told us that he’d point out a straight road if we ever saw one. This was one hell of a course. My plan, such as I had one, was to power walk the hills and when my endurance gave out. This started in earnest at mile four when we hit the longest & steepest uphill simultaneously. Bermuda is the anti-flat. This was the hardest, but also the most scenic half marathon I’d ever run. If I had to give up a scenic view for one less hill – wow. That would be an impossible choice.

I chatted to both the 2:45 and 3:00 pacers for their plans and both were doing 3:1 intervals walking the hills. I started with 2:45 and kept them in sight for a few miles, but I knew that wasn’t realistic. I didn’t do intervals so much as run when I could, walk when I needed to. Somewhere around mile eight or nine my goal shifted from not finishing with the sweeper to coming in below three hours. I’d stayed with/ahead of them for so long I thought that was a reasonable goal even as I expected to tire in the final quarter.

All the OnPace pacers were awesome, but Mandi and Marissa get a special shout out for pushing us through the finish.  At mile nine-ten ish I felt strong enough to drop the intervals and gained on them a bit, which was good as it provided a cushion when I power walked much of mile eleven. By this point I was flat out determined to break three.  When our watches neared thirteen, Mandi and Marissa told us that the finish was just around the corner and to go as it was too early for them to finish as pacers. We took off and I can’t wait to see my finish photos as I was probably a smiling fool. I had about three glasses of seltzer from the finish line festival before heading back up to the finish to watch the last runner come through. She was surrounded by Pacers who had finished their assignments and went back out to bring her in. No one finishes alone was an awesome motto and I can’t wait to do another race where On Pace are the pacers.

My time? It was the slowest of my eight Halfs. Do I care? Not one iota. The goal for this one was finishing, ideally smiling. DONE.

I am an adult.. I did not stay up all night until a 6a shuttle figuring What the hell, I’ll sleep on the plane.  I was too tired from waking early and the half and went to bed around nine after a wonderful closing dinner at Henry VIII. This is 40.

General Thoughts:

  • Running a half marathon untrained is absolutely ridiculous. I knew this, and this is why I deferred Fort Lauderdale. but I was stubborn and didn’t want to miss out on the fun in Bermuda. I don’t regret this choice as I’m not sore at all and my knee is no worse than it had been after the Manhattan 7, but I’m not doing this again. I don’t have a Half on my calendar and am going to keep it that way for now. It’s time to train properly for the Cherry Blossom Ten Miler and go from there.
  • Because I did not train, I did not practice my fueling. An email about Gu on the course reminded me to throw some chews in my suitcase, and I ate a handful of Citrus Chews throughout. This worked fine and I was glad to have them as I got hungry despite my usual pre-race breakfast bar.
  • Back to my theme of sustainability, I was glad at a couple of water stops when the volunteers offered to fill my water bottle rather than me take a cup and pour the water into my cup.
  • Since we were mostly out of town and the island has such a small population, this isn’t a race with crowd support. It didn’t matter. It was lovely to see some locals who were out and about cheer us on.
  • Running on the left side of the road with traffic and mostly without shoulder or sidewalk was a little unnerving, especially with the curves. I felt though that traffic gave us as wide a berth as it could and we were never in danger.
  • Running without music (for safety) was no issue as the scenery was enough of a distraction.

While I can’t go back to Bermuda next year as I have an entry for Fort Lauderdale due to deferring this year, I’d do another Zooma race in a heartbeat if the destination was somewhere I wanted to run. It was well supported, the communication was great, the SWAG was good (the medals were GORGEOUS) and the location couldn’t have been better. Amelia Island might be too warm for my liking in October, but Cape Cod is tempting me.

Training begins and racecation news

First international racecation is booked! I’ve been vaguely aware of Zooma from MCM Mama Runs and Wendy (? I think) when she posted about Great Lakes, but when MCM & Marcia posted about Bermuda, it went from vaguely aware to ooh! Bermuda is one of those places I’ve always thought about going but never acted on, so I’m glad running gave me a reason. Can’t wait to meet some of you.

As I think I mentioned, a colleague and I ended up signing up for Jack Rabbit’s Rogue Training. It’s reasonably priced at $85/month, or about $10/run. The best part is the schedule (6:45p Wednesday, 8a Saturday) works for me in that I can make almost all of them.  The 15% discount on non-electronics is great too as JackRabbit’s stock is more extensive than the New Balance store at NYRR.  Workouts began last Saturday but I was out of town so picked up with the group on Wednesday. More on that below.

I’m calling June 19 the official start of marathon training as that’s when I started with the group. To keep myself accountable, I’m also donating $1/mile to the Joyful Heart Foundation. Although I have my own bib, I still wanted to run for a cause. It’s always one of those I donate to regularly, and wanted to tie my marathon fundraising to it. Since I don’t know if my legs are going to reliably hold up to Sunday’s recovery run, I’m calling Saturday the end of the week for mileage tracking.

Not post related at all, but I read a really interesting post about “bad” race recovery. Some really good and out of the box advice.

Weekly Run Down with Deborah and Kim:

  • never miss a Monday: strength training edition. This was TBD cross or strength but when I walked into the gym, the decision was made. If there was AC, it was at 1% and it was way too humid for that nonsense. So full PT and weights cycle and some yoga.
  • Tuesday: treadmill was the plan. Drinks with colleagues was the reality so I walked home after.
look at that pace!
  • Wednesday: Rogue training day 1. I was super nervous about this. Mostly about keeping up with the group. The delayed start for latecomers and then dynamic stretches in the Time Warner Center did not help the anxiety. The prescribed run

Runners will do 2 miles of warm-up then 8-10 strides on a ~100m section of road or track. Then, runners will cool down for 2 or 3 miles to finish the workout. Runners will build their speed for 1/3, hold it for 1/3, and then coast to a stop letting off the gas in the final 1/3. In that middle 1/3, runners will reach ~90% of peak speed in a controlled sprint. Runners will walk back to the start after each stride and repeat. Walk, not jog the recoveries back to the start b/c we want full neuromuscular recovery.

  • the actual run was more like a .5 mile warmup to the Mall because they were worried about the weather and moved the Strides from the bridle path at Engineers’ Gate to the Mall which is paved v. gravel. The strides were a challenge, but not an impossible one. If my Garmin is right, I actually hit something resembling fast. Holy crap though I cannot imagine running at that speed for a 5K let alone a marathon. We then ran the “long way” out via Bethesda Terrace and down the east side before finishing at Columbus Circle. We finished with some fun foot exercises before dispersing. I followed this with a stint at the gym to stretch and do more of my PT. There are two others who are about my speed which gives me some comfort as I definitely could not do the 9:40 warmup that the main group did. I guess this could be called my first proper speedwork?
runset!
so thankful for a tub!
  • Thursday: holy soreness Batman! Did not expect that from the strides. Mother Nature finally sorted herself out for a moment and I squeezed in a 3.5 mile recovery run before the skies opened again. Oddly I had no plans of running near home. In fact when I forgot my sneakers this morning I came home between meetings to get them because I thought I’d need to run in the gym and if I went home first it wouldn’t happen. But when the skies cleared it was too late to stash at NYRR and I knew lockers would be full so I hopped on the train and changed quickly before dashing back out. The coaches last night emphasized recovery runs being slow, I think I took that to heart. Also, 90% humidity. When I picked this apartment I was indifferent to a tub. Now? I can’t imagine running without it. I’ve hopped between brands but this is my favorite, I love the eucalyptus.
you are not an XL
  • Friday: off. Lots of steps, some shopping and a sunset ferry ride. I went to see if I could exchange the Pride tee shirt for smaller, but they were out. I did find this shirt hiding among the Queens 10K clearance! The sizing was stupid, but I bought it anyway because I really love it.
  • Saturday: first long run with the group. We met at JackRabbit just before 8 and after an icebreaker and dynamic warmups we hit the park. The coach said at the beginning that as it got warmer we’ll go out earlier. I fell behind the pack in the first mile, which I expected and was fine with. Trying to keep up in mile one would mean I cratered at halfway. Besides, it’s the Park and that’s (part of) why I chose this group. Uncertainty of marathon training but in the comfort of my favorite terrain. Plus, if I can survive the CP hills, I’ll survive the bridges. I ended up catching up with one of the women I finished with Wednesday, who I learned is planning to run not only NYC, but the 60K a few weeks later! I was happy with the run, it was about on par with the women’s mini although the heat meant I felt a little less strong. It was also my first without music in a while as I didn’t think to grab headphones before I left. I got back to the stretching area outside JackRabbit just a few minutes after the main group.  Finished the day with some well-deserved laziness and a very good book, Richard Grant’s Dispatches from Pluto.
  • Sunday: short, hot shakeout. I woke up on time to go out early, but an attack of the lazy Sundays hit. I was also underhydrated due to sushi for dinner Saturday night.

 

2019 NYC Marathon Training Miles (eek! In writing. Legit): 12.82

$ Raised for Joyful Heart: $12.82

Plan for the Week:

  • Monday: off, dinner plans with friends. And I think Mondays are going to become an off day if I regularly manage the Sunday recovery runs.
  • Tuesday: run
  • Wednesday: off, planned work event and can’t make the group workout
  • Thursday: group workout, 30/90 fartleks
  • Friday: off (as actually scheduled in the plan)
  • Saturday: Pride5M with run to and from for extra miles. They changed the course this year, so I see I’m going to be all Harlem Hills all the time. Self: this is a good thing.
  • Sunday: Pride March. Not calling that an off day